Black History Month: The Libyan Slaves of the 21st Century.

Thanks to the darlings of the American Left, Hillary Clinton and Barak Obama, Libya has been destabilized to the point that an African slave trade has resurfaced. The irony is that the Democratic party, the party of the KKK, Jim Crow, school segregation and other racist activities paints itself as friends of the African American. After orchestrating Qadaffi’s death, then Secretary of State Clinton joked, “We came, we saw, he died.”

I wish to dedicate today’s Black History Month to the modern slaves, who are in the position they are in because of failed Democrat US foreign policy.

More here and here.

Black History Month: Nebraska’s Buffalo Soldiers

Black History Month: Frederick Douglass 1818-1895

I would like to contribute to Black History Month by highlighting men and women of excellence, and when possible, of Christian character. I will intentionally avoid Marxists, Socialists, Liberation Theologians and those who advocate (or participated in) the murder of innocent people. Angela Davis comes to mind, a celebrated terrorist.

“I was not more than thirteen years old, when in my loneliness and destitution I longed for someone to whom I could go, as to a father and protector. The preaching of a white Methodist minister, named Hanson, was the means of causing me to feel that in God I had such a friend. He thought that all men, great and small, bond and free, were sinners in the sight of God: that they were by nature rebels against His government; and that they must repent of their sins, and be reconciled to God through Christ. I cannot say that I had a very distinct notion of what was required of me, but one thing I did know well: I was wretched and had no means of making myself otherwise.
I consulted a good old colored man named Charles Lawson, and in tones of holy affection he told me to pray, and to “cast all my care upon God.” This I sought to do; and though for weeks I was a poor, broken-hearted mourner, traveling through doubts and fears, I finally found my burden lightened, and my heart relieved. I loved all mankind, slaveholders not excepted, though I abhorred slavery more than ever. I saw the world in a new light, and my great concern was to have everybody converted. My desire to learn increased, and especially, did I want a thorough acquaintance with the contents of the Bible.”

While I appreciate his Christian commitment, I wonder about his two favourite theologians, David Friedrich Strauss and Ludwig Feuerbach, neither of whom were believers. While Douglass was called an early “Liberation Theologian,” his views were nothing like the destructive Liberation Theology of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, that are responsible for millions of deaths.

More here.

Douglass’ views on Socialism here.